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Evolutions Treatment Center offers multiple levels of rehabilitation care for alcohol, drug, and mental health difficulties. Our primary addiction treatment program revolves around a 30-day stay at our luxury addiction treatment center located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

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2901 W CYPRESS CREEK ROAD SUITE 123

FORT LAUDERDALE 33009 

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© 2023  BY EVOLUTIONS TREATMENT CENTER. ALL RIGHT RESERVED

ALCOHOL RELATED TREATMENTS

Treatment for Alcohol Problems: Finding and Getting Help

 

 

When Is It Time for Treatment?

Alcohol-related problems — which result from drinking too much, too fast, or too often — are among the most significant public health issues in the United States.

Many people struggle with controlling their drinking at some time in their lives. Approximately 17 million adults ages 18 and older have an alcohol use disorder (AUD) and 1 in 10 children live in a home with a parent who has a drinking problem.

 

Does Treatment Work?

The good news is that no matter how severe the problem may seem, most people with an alcohol use disorder can benefit from some form of treatment.

Research shows that about one-third of people who are treated for alcohol problems have no further symptoms 1 year later. Many others substantially reduce their drinking and report fewer alcohol-related problems.

 

Signs of an Alcohol Problem

Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a medical condition that doctors diagnose when a patient’s drinking causes distress or harm. The condition can range from mild to severe and is diagnosed when a patient answers “yes” to two or more of the following questions.

In the past year, have you:

  • Had times when you ended up drinking more, or longer than you intended?

  • More than once wanted to cut down or stop drinking, or tried to, but couldn’t?

  • Spent a lot of time drinking? Or being sick or getting over the aftereffects?

  • Experienced craving — a strong need, or urge, to drink?

  • Found that drinking — or being sick from drinking — often interfered with taking care of your home or family? Or caused job troubles? Or school problems?

  • Continued to drink even though it was causing trouble with your family or friends?

  • Given up or cut back on activities that were important or interesting to you, or gave you pleasure, in order to drink?

  • More than once gotten into situations while or after drinking that increased your chances of getting hurt (such as driving, swimming, using machinery, walking in a dangerous area, or having unsafe sex)?

  • Continued to drink even though it was making you feel depressed or anxious or adding to another health problem? Or after having had a memory blackout?

  • Had to drink much more than you once did to get the effect you want? Or found that your usual number of drinks had much less effect than before?

  • Found that when the effects of alcohol were wearing off, you had withdrawal symptoms, such as trouble sleeping, shakiness, irritability, anxiety, depression, restlessness, nausea, or sweating? Or sensed things that were not there?

 

If you have any of these symptoms, your drinking may already be a cause for concern. The more symptoms you have, the more urgent the need for change. A health professional can conduct a formal assessment of your symptoms to see if an alcohol use disorder is present. For an online assessment of your drinking pattern, you can call one of our trained coordinator to seek help 1866-771-7091

 

How to choose the right treatment ?

 

Everyone has different needs when it comes to treating alcohol use disorder (AUD), a condition that can be diagnosed when your pattern of alcohol use is problematic and causes significant distress. It can range from mild to severe, depending on how many symptoms you have. The care you'll need depends in part on where you fall in that range.

Some people with AUD become dependent on alcohol and have withdrawal symptoms when they suddenly stop drinking. The effects of withdrawal on your body and mind can be uncomfortable and dangerous. That’s where detox comes in.

 

 

What Is Detox?

Detox alone isn’t treatment, but it’s the first step to getting better for people who are dependent on alcohol.

When someone with a dependence on alcohol suddenly stops drinking, usually within 6-24 hours after their last drink, they might develop withdrawal symptoms. This can start while they still have alcohol in their blood.

Withdrawal symptoms are mild for some but much more serious for others.

You may have:

  • Anxiety

  • Delirium tremens (DTs), a life-threatening issue that can make you restless, upset, and confused and cause fever, hallucinations, and seizures

  • Depression

  • Hallucinations, when you see or hear things that aren’t there

  • Problems sleeping

  • Shakiness, especially in your hands

  • Unstable changes in blood pressure and heart rate

Do I Need a Detox Program?

If you need alcohol for your body to feel normal, then you likely need help. Getting through detox isn’t just a matter of willpower, and stopping "cold turkey" without at least medical help is never recommended. In some cases, withdrawal can put your life at risk. Even when it’s not as serious, it’s still a big challenge.

 

A program gives you support to guide you through the withdrawal. That often includes medicine to help ease symptoms as well as care for medical and mental health conditions.

 

Your symptoms may last a week or more, typically hitting their worst within 24-72 hours. You’re more likely to stick with a detox program when you have lots of help.

 

 

What Happens During Detox?

Usually, you can expect a detox program to include these basic things:

  • An intake exam so the detox team can see what kind of support you’ll need. You may get blood work, talk about your health and drinking history, and have tests to check your physical and mental health.

  • Detox support, which may include medicine for withdrawal symptoms and care for other issues that come up. The goal is to help you get mentally and physically stable. You may have your temperature, blood pressure, heart rate, and breathing checked regularly during this process.

  • Help getting into treatment so you can learn to break your addiction.

 

 

Types of Programs

When you think about detox programs, it helps to look a step ahead to rehab. That’s because you’ll also need treatment to break your addiction, and some programs combine the two.

Your two basic options for detox programs are:

Inpatient, where you live at a our detox clinic during the process. You’ll have care around the clock to help you through.

Residential rehab, where you live at a center, usually runs for 1-3 months. These are good if you have a more serious problem and struggle to stay sober.

Partial hospitalization or day treatment is where you live at home but you go for treatment at a hospital or clinic at least 5 days a week. It can be an alternative to inpatient or residential treatment or a step-down from one of those programs.

Intensive outpatient treatment involves a scheduled series of visits that are longer and more in-depth than a traditional outpatient program.

 

Advice For Friends and Family Members

Caring for a person who has problems with alcohol can be very stressful. It is important that as you try to help your loved one, you find a way to take care of yourself as well. It may help to seek support from others, including friends, family, community, and support groups. If you are developing your own symptoms of depression or anxiety, think about seeking professional help for yourself. Remember that your loved one is ultimately responsible for managing his or her illness.

 

However, your participation can make a big difference. Based on clinical experience, many health providers believe that support from friends and family members is important in overcoming alcohol problems. But friends and family may feel unsure about how best to provide the support needed. The groups for family and friends listed below under Resources may be a good starting point.

Remember that changing deep habits is hard, takes time, and requires repeated efforts. We usually experience failures along the way, learn from them, and then keep going. Alcohol use disorders are no different. Try to be patient with your loved one. Overcoming this disorder is not easy or quick.

Pay attention to your loved one when he or she is doing better or simply making an effort. Too often we are so angry or discouraged that we take it for granted when things are going better. A word of appreciation or acknowledgement of a success can go a long way.

 

This guide is written for individuals, and their family and friends, who are looking for options to address alcohol problems. It is intended as a resource to understand what treatment choices are available and what to consider when selecting

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