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Evolutions Treatment Center offers multiple levels of rehabilitation care for alcohol, drug, and mental health difficulties. Our primary addiction treatment program revolves around a 30-day stay at our luxury addiction treatment center located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

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2901 W CYPRESS CREEK ROAD SUITE 123

FORT LAUDERDALE 33009 

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THE RESULTS ARE IN : Impressive outcomes from patients reports

Updated: Jan 16, 2019



At Evolutions Treatment Center we are invested in providing evidenced based clinical interventions. In 2018 Evolutions Treatment Center released our outcomes data from 2017 and we are excited to soon be able to report on the results from this past year. In anticipation of the release of our 2018 outcomes that are currently being analyzed, we would like to summarize the prior results for those who did not have the opportunity to review them.

This information has been gathered over an extensive period of time and has been amalgamated into simple graphs and is currently being organized into a longitudinal and ongoing research study to ensure the efficacy of our clinical programming and outcomes of our treatment program. Below is a summary of key 2017 results. Full results with detailed statistics can be found at: https://www.evolutionstreatment.com/outcomes


Pre and Post Assessments

To ensure the efficacy of our practices we conduct pre and post-test assessments with patients to determine treatment outcomes. At the current time we utilize two measures that have strong psychometric properties, the BSCQ and the BASIS-24. These measures are administered to those patients wishing to participate at admission and discharge.

Taken together, these two instruments assess our patient’s confidence level in high risk and potentially triggering situations as well as to examine self-reported change over the course of our co-occurring substance abuse and/or mental health treatment.

THE BRIEF SITUATIONAL CONFIDENCE QUESTIONNAIRE (BSCQ)

The Brief Situational Confidence Questionnaire (BSCQ) was developed as a state dependent measure to assess self-confidence in varied situations that might evoke cravings or the urge to use substances or alcohol. The eight situations that are assessed include:

· Negative emotional states

· Negative physical states

· Positive emotional states

· Testing personal control

· Urges and temptations

· Interpersonal conflict

· Social pressure

· Pleasant times with others

The individual is asked to assess where their confidence is at in the current moment with regard to resisting the urge to abuse drugs or alcohol in those situations. The score is derived from a Likert scale that measures from no confidence at 0% to totally confident at 100%. The psychometric properties of the Brief Situational Confidence Questionnaire (BSCQ) were determined through studies conducted by the developer of the scale and colleagues (Breslina, Sobell , Sobell & Agrawald, 2000). Correlation coefficients for the subscales ranged from 0.56 to 0.80 and the Cronbach's alpha coefficients was 0.85 for the BSCQ indicating a high level of internal consistency for this 8-item instrument (Nunnally, 1970).

The overall findings of the Brief Situational Confidence Questionnaire (BSCQ) indicate that when patients first admitted to Evolutions Treatment Center, their overall confidence level in being able to cope with eight different types of problematic situations (Negative emotional states, Negative physical states, Positive emotional states, Testing personal control, Urges and temptations, Interpersonal conflict, Social pressure, Pleasant times with others) was approximately sixty five percent (65.4188). Upon discharge, patients’ overall confidence level in being able to cope with eight different types of problematic situations increased to approximately eighty five percent (85.3825). This difference in confidence was statistically significant when conducting a two tailed paired samples T-Test with a 95% confidence interval.

Patients reported significantly improved confidence in being able to cope with problematic situations.

Another section of the Brief Situational Confidence Questionnaire (BSCQ) indicates that when patients first admitted to Evolutions Treatment Center, their overall confidence level in being able to cope with being depressed with things in general or if everything was going badly for them without relapsing was approximately sixty three percent (63.03) and upon discharge was approximately eighty four percent (84.43). This difference in confidence was statistically significant when conducting a two tailed paired samples T-Test with a 95% confidence interval with an N of 70 paired pre and posttest participants.

Overall confidence in coping with depressing thoughts and feelings without relapsing increased.

The urges and temptations section of the Brief Situational Confidence Questionnaire (BSCQ) indicates that when patients first admitted to Evolutions Treatment Center, their overall confidence level in being able to cope with the sudden urge to engage in the behavior they want to change or if they were in a situation where the behavior had occurred or if they began to think how good it was to engage in the behavior again, without relapsing was approximately sixty two percent (62.77) and upon discharge was approximately eighty three percent (83.47). This difference in confidence was statistically significant when conducting a two tailed paired samples T-Test with a 95% confidence interval with an N of 70 paired pre and posttest participants.

Patients were significantly more assured in their ability to cope with urges without relapsing.

The social pressure section of the Brief Situational Confidence Questionnaire (BSCQ) indicates that when patients first admitted to Evolutions Treatment Center, their overall confidence level in being able to cope with social or peer pressure to engage in the behavior that they want to change, without relapsing was approximately sixty three percent (63.03) and upon discharge was approximately eighty six percent (86.93). This difference in confidence was statistically significant when conducting a two tailed paired samples T-Test with a 95% confidence interval with an N of 70 paired pre and posttest participants.

Patients’ confidence in their ability to cope with peer pressure without relapsing increased.

THE BASIS-24

The Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale (BASIS-24) consists of 24 items divided into 6 subscales and is a self-administered tool structured to assess co-occurring mental health and/or substance abuse treatment from the patient’s perspective. Behaviors and symptoms relating to the prior week are rated by the patients taking the survey upon admission and discharge.

The psychometric properties of the BASIS-24 were determined through field testing (inpatient N= 2,623; outpatient N= 3,228). Internal Consistency coefficients (Cronbach’s alpha) were computed for each BASIS-24 subscale and for the overall score, Test-Retest Reliability coefficients analysis demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability, and Discriminant Validity indicated significant differences between subject groups.

The six subscales include the following:

· Depression and level of adaptive functioning, including difficulties with concentration, coping strategies, nervousness and depressive symptoms

· Relationships, focusing on feeling connected and compatibility with others

· Self-Harm, such as suicidal ideation

· Emotional Lability, emphasizing mood and dysregulation

· Psychosis, including auditory and visual hallucinations as well as persecutory thoughts/beliefs

· Substance Abuse, highlighting urges, cravings, and repercussions

There is also an overall score which is a composite of the means of all 24 items.

The overall findings of the Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale (BASIS-24) indicate that when patients first admitted to Evolutions Treatment Center, their perception of and emotions related to different areas of their life (including depression and level of functioning, including concentration, coping strategies, nervousness and depressive symptoms, relationships, focusing on connection and compatibility, self-harm and suicidality, emotional dysregulation and mood issues, psychotic symptoms, as well as urges, cravings, and repercussions associated with substance abuse) were more difficult or problematic at admission than upon discharge from treatment. Patients reported that they had between a little to a moderate level of difficulty (1.2263) overall in the above domains upon admission to treatment. Upon discharge, patients’ perceived level of difficulty lowered to between experiencing a little difficulty to no difficulty (.6788) in these same domains. This difference in level of perceived difficulty was statistically significant when conducting a two tailed paired samples T-Test with a 95% confidence interval.

Patients indicated that they believed that there were significant improvements in many areas of their lives by the end of treatment.

The question pertaining to managing life of the Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale (BASIS-24) indicates that when patients first admitted to Evolutions Treatment Center, their ability to manage their day to day life was more difficult or problematic than upon discharge from treatment. Patients reported that they experienced between a little to a moderate level of difficulty (1.15) upon admission to treatment. Upon discharge, patients’ perceived difficulty lowered to between experiencing a little difficulty to no difficulty (.36) in these same domains. This difference in level of perceived difficulty was statistically significant when conducting a two tailed paired samples T-Test with a 95% confidence interval with an N of 67 paired pre and posttest participants.

There was the belief that life was significantly more manageable by the end of treatment.

The coping with problems question of the Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale (BASIS-24) indicates that when patients first admitted to Evolutions Treatment Center, their ability to cope with problems in life was more difficult or problematic than upon discharge from treatment. Patients reported that they experienced between a little to a moderate level of difficulty (1.69) upon admission to treatment. Upon discharge, patients’ perceived difficulty lowered to between experiencing a little difficulty to no difficulty (.75) in the same domain. This difference in level of perceived difficulty was statistically significant when conducting a two tailed paired samples T-Test with a 95% confidence interval with an N of 67 paired pre and posttest participants.

Patients reported that they believed that they were significantly more able to cope with problems in life at the completion of treatment.

The confidence question of the Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale (BASIS-24) indicates that when patients first admitted to Evolutions Treatment Center, the amount of the time that they felt confidence in themselves was lower than upon discharge from treatment. Patients reported that they experienced confidence in themselves between a little to half of the time (1.61) upon admission to treatment. Upon discharge, patients’ perceived level of confidence increased to between most of the time and all of the time (.87). This difference in level of perceived confidence in the self was statistically significant when conducting a two tailed paired samples T-Test with a 95% confidence interval with an N of 67 paired pre and posttest participants.

Patients reported that they had a significant increase in self-confidence by the end of treatment.

Thanks again for reviewing our prior outcomes results.

Stay tuned for the upcoming release of our 2018 outcomes study.

Full results of last year’s study can be found at https://www.evolutionstreatment.com/outcomes